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By JMP Solicitors, Jan 19 2018 11:41AM



You have recently got married

•Getting married revokes any previous Will. Your assets will pass to your spouse as next-of-kin.


You and your partner choose to live together, “marriage is just a contract”. You are both independent from each other. “What is mine is yours is an unwritten contract”

Unless you have a Will, the Rules of Intestacy will not recognise your common-law partner. All your assets will pass, by very strict rules, to your next of kin. This means your closest surviving blood relative inherits your assets. There is no such thing as a “common-law” spouse.


You have children under 18.

What would happen if you were both (hope not...but it might) die? Statistics show that this is a remote possibility. But what would happen to your little kids if you were both to die? If both of you die, and no official guardians are appointed through a Will, your children could end up in foster care while the court appoints a guardian. And, as if this was not a horrible prospect enough, there are money issues too.


You are on your second marriage and have bought a house together. You both have children from other relationships and have children together.

When two people buy a house together, in law, you buy this asset jointly. This means that when you die, your spouse automatically inherits 100% of your equity. Now. Supposing that you both have children from another marriage and you would like your half of the equity in your house to be passed on to your own kids. That will not happen. All your share of the value of the house passes to the surviving spouse. And they can do what they like. You effectively disinherit your own children.


Making a will is more straight-forward than you think.


Making a Will is actually really easy. The more discussion and thinking you do before you engage a lawyer or Will writing service the better. At JMP Solicitors we have a questionnaire that helps you to have a structured approach to all the matters you need to think about. You can complete this before you make an appointment speeding up the drafting process.


The fixed fee we quote is the fee you pay. There will be no nasty surprises. The fee includes free, secure storage.




By JMP Solicitors, Jan 15 2018 10:30AM

There may never be a right time to step back and reflect-particularly as an owner of a business says Head of Commercial Law at JMP Solicitors, Grantham, Sonia Braybrook.


Getting away from it all means different things to different people and the Christmas holidays are often quite busy with family and social activities.


If you managed to snatch some time in a corner of the sofa or --even better—on a beach, did you think about the new year and what it might bring?


Or did you set time aside over the holiday (if you had one) to decide what you would bring to your new year?


In any case around now is a good time to reflect -just as on your personal lifestyle as on your business.

The way you want your business to be ideally compared with where it is now is a good start.


There are standard checklists beginning with your business plan and customer/supplier bases.


Your staff, their personal circumstances and motivations should be re-considered for 2018, unless you have this covered by in-year reviews.


Marketing and growth may be of special interest this year as the UK learns to be more independent.


The details may be important; are your books and records up to date? Is there a job that you have been putting off that could be tackled now?


What is likely to be interesting in 2018?

Of universal importance will be the General Data Protection Regulations due to come into force in May 2018 and that will have the effect of requiring all businesses to update their approach to the use of personal data.


Advances in the use of technology will be used to try to reduce costs in all fields but bring other challenges; as previously reported we see increasing electronic use in litigation.


Contracts are not becoming simpler.

There appears to be an attitude towards tightening of legal loopholes in areas of company, employment and tax and towards increasing self-reporting and self-regulation.


Government initiatives for domestic legislation are starting to emerge after its concentration on Brexit and we have just heard about the proposed 25-year plan for the environment which is the subject of many comments already.


If nothing else, maybe the first “resolution” should be to set aside a regular time every week for reflection.


We at JMP wish you and yours a successful 2018.





By JMP Solicitors, Jan 4 2018 10:00AM

Three out of five people in the UK do not have a Will in place that details what happens to their affairs, dependents and assets once they die.


Why do so many people put off making a new Will?


Some people believe that their friends and family will be able to decide between them who should inherit what. Actually, these decisions are taken out of the family’s hands entirely. The state intervenes employing the strict rules of intestacy. Others may feel that they are too young and healthy to worry about making a Will.


Making a Will is often thought to be a complicated, lengthy process and expensive, which is another reason why many people may choose to put it off until another day.


Let’s just address some of these concerns.


Leaving it to chance


If you die without having a valid Will in place, then the law will decide who should inherit what from you. This is determined under the Rules of Intestacy, which put your relatives into a set order of priority. These rules are strict and do not acknowledge unmarried partners or step-children, so you could find that some of your loved ones would be set to inherit nothing from you. With a Will, you can create Trusts to help preserve wealth for future generations, protect against residential care costs or help vulnerable or disabled beneficiaries.


I’m not going to die anytime soon


Yes, but… You may be young and healthy, but you never know when the unthinkable might happen, so it makes sense for everyone to have a Will.


A Will is specific to an individual, there is no such thing as a general Will. Your Will covers your funeral wishes for example, and if you have dependents, appoints people you trust to look after your children under 18 years (Guardians).


Making a Will is complicated and expensive


Making a Will is actually really easy. The more discussion and thinking you do before you engage a lawyer or Will writing service the better. At JMP Solicitors we have a questionnaire that helps you to have a structured approach to all the matters you need to think about. You can complete this before you make an appointment speeding up the drafting process.


The fixed fee we quote is the fee you pay. There will be no nasty surprises. The fee includes free, secure storage.




By JMP Solicitors, Dec 15 2017 02:28PM

Happy Christmas Jumper Day everyone. we are raising money for charity today and feeling festive.


Best wishes to all of our clients, suppliers and people we have helped in 2017 from all at JMP Solicitors.

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